Tuesday, September 17, 2013

2013 Flood in Colorado and New Mexico:The Untold Stories



Greeley resident Tommy Meyer leads one of his horses to safety as flood waters from the South Platte River swamped his farm at 22378 Highway 34 east of Greeley on Sept, 13, 2013. Photo by Doug Conarroe, North Forty News
Greeley resident Tommy Meyer leads one of his horses to safety
as flood waters from the South Platte River swamped his farm at 22378 Highway 34 east of Greeley on Sept, 13, 2013.
Photo by Doug Conarroe, North Forty News
  

We have been reporting the news of the floods here in Colorado - water still rising and overflowing banks and it is traveling east and south. As I stated in my first report, water flows downhill and it is only downhill from here on the Eastern high desert - Mile high and above.

As drier air comes in and the fogs lift along the Front Range, it is time to take stock of the new world in which we are to find.  Much of that local world is gone or misplaced.  For many, they will be returning to a place that is no longer there; Or a place no longer standing.  Lives changed, some irreparably, as they return to find nothing left - lost homes, and reminders of years gone by; for many, lost family and friends.

The "Great Flood" of 2013 - the "1000 year" flood; the "biblical" flood; the "unprecedented" flood - is far from over.  Waters are spreading east and south to already swollen creeks and rivers -  The eastern plains; the northern plains; and New Mexico have felt the wrath of nature as well - the reminder...a HARD reminder that we are wreaking havoc on the planet (14 years of drought, a few years of devastating firestorm,  then unprecedented rainfall...).





Colorado - the toxic gift the oil and gas companies keep on giving:

County Line Road, north of Erie (Courtesy of Cliff Willmeng)
County Line Road, north of Erie (Courtesy of Cliff Willmeng)
  

The stories untold of gas and oil tanks washing out and dumping their black toxins into the water to spread across the soils; broken oil pipelines;  the fracking chemicals (approximately 40,000 gallons of toxic chemicals are used for each fracturing) leeching into the flood waters to poison everything it touches - Benzene, Radium, Mercury, Formaldehyde, Lead, Uranium, Hydrochloric Acid...up to 600 different heavy metals and toxic chemicals are shoved into pristine land and into the bedrock to release the natural gas, with the added  side benefit, the release Methane (25 times more toxic as a greenhouse gas than CO2).........

Fracking Colorado - More information at "Save Colorado From Fracking"
Fracking Colorado -
More information at "Save Colorado From Fracking"
  

.........All traveling through the scarred fire burn, off the rocks, into the canyons, the highways and roads;  across the water filled lands, rushing into the streams, down the culverts and sewers - into reservoirs and water treatment facilities; along the golf courses and manicured lawns of  suburbia; out to the rich fields that grow the peaches, the squash, the cherries, the cantaloupe, the spinach, the corn, the wheat, and the rest of the food crops for Colorado and beyond the flower and garden nurseries that grow the plants for your homes.

 County Line Road, north of Erie (Courtesy of Cliff Willmeng) via the Boulder Daily Camera, "Boulder County activists concerned about flooded oil, gas wells"
County Line Road, north of Erie (Courtesy of Cliff Willmeng)
via the 
Boulder Daily Camera, "Boulder County activists
concerned about flooded oil, gas wells"

As a side note, activists in Boulder are letting out a healthy scream...Thank you Occupy, activists from Clean Water Action and environmentalists...
In a statement, Gary Wockner, of Clean Water Action, said "Fracking and operating oil and gas facilities in floodplains is extremely risky. Flood waters can topple facilities and spread oil, gas, and cancer-causing fracking chemicals across vast landscapes making contamination and clean-up efforts exponentially worse and more complicated."


The Navajo Nation - Flooding on the "Rez":


Flooding September 13 and 14, 2013 in the Navajo Nation
Flooding September 13 and 14, 2013 in the Navajo Nation


Flooding September 13, 2013, Navajo Nation
Flooding September 13 and 14, 2013 in the Navajo Nation
  

Flooding Navajo Nation September 23, 2013
Flooding September 13 - Navajo Nation


The flooding hit there 4 days ago, as reported by the Navajo Nation Times and Indian Country Today Media Network.

The first Americans, the Indigenous peoples, the true natives of the land, now living on the Rez ...for many in the cities and states around this nation, it might as well be another planet.

The two were swept away by raging floodwaters on Wednesday September 11 as they tried to make it home along with two other friends, who survived. Just a week earlier the pair had vacationed with Quinlan’s mother, Glenda Aretxuloeta, to celebrate her birthday and meet her Native family members, the Denver Post reported.

"He was very, very connected to my Native American heritage," Aretxuloeta told the newspaper, which did not give a tribal name.


The Navajo Nation has been hit hard with flooding from the storms.

Mother Earth continues raging as she withheld the waters from the sky, scorched the earth with fire, now washes it all away with the floods.

The effects will be felt for weeks, months, even years after the clouds part.   Even after the rains that fall in record-breaking amounts, the flow from upstream will continue the flooding, bringing with it the "Civilized" world of oil and toxins, garbage and refuse, crashing onto the reservations.

The two worlds - the two universes have collided,  once again....

And another reminder of the continued annihilation our exceptionalist hubris brings...

.....To the first Americans, the Indigenous peoples, the true natives of the land, now living on the Rez


Contact to assist flood victims -  the Navajo Nation:

Volunteers can contact the Navajo Nation Department of Emergency Management Emergency Operation Center at 505-371-8415, 505-371- 8416, 505-371-8417.

 

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